Is It Just Me…

meowser-48.jpg posted by meowser

…or has anyone else noted that (with the exception of fat acceptance blogs and heavily moderated feminist blogs like Shakesville and FWD) the comments section of virtually any article or blog post having to do with fat people in any way quickly devolves into a series of unsolicited diet tips? EET LES AND MUV MORE LA LA LA OF THERMODYNAMICS I TEWTALLY LOOSED 15 POUNDS ONCE AND KEPT 10 OF THEM OFF 4EVER SO U CAN LOOZE 100 IF U TRY IT’S SCIENCE.

Just wonderin’.

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31 Responses to “Is It Just Me…”

  1. Twistie Says:

    This is actually a big part of the reason that I wrap myself in the Fatosphere and hesitate to come out and play in a lot of other venues.

    I also notice that people I have known for decades, who have always been heavy, who are shaped precisely like their parents, who have ALREADY TRIED every diet and ‘lifestyle change’ known to man and beast, who have watched their children grow up without overeating and wind up precisely the same shape as they are, have become yet more determined that if only they had done it right, everyone in their family would be slim, trim, and picture perfect.

    Seriously, the very same data that has caused me to say that I’m just going to live my life because it’s healthier for both my body and my mind to simply treat myself well has made them decide they are Just Not Believing Hard Enough and that if I don’t join them in their irrational beliefs, Tinkerbell is going to kick her tiny bucket.

    You know what? I’ve always freaking hated Peter Pan. Hand me a shovel. I’ll give Tink a decent burial and tell Wendy she doesn’t have to darn all the Lost Boys’ socks anymore.

  2. meowser Says:

    I’ll give Tink a decent burial and tell Wendy she doesn’t have to darn all the Lost Boys’ socks anymore.

    Hee!

  3. La di da Says:

    It’s a bad case of “Someone is wrong on the internet!” in the most annoying mansplainy way ever.

    I HAVE HEARD EVERY DIET TIP EVER ALREADY. Saying it again on the internets isn’t going to make me thin.

  4. living400lbs Says:

    Nope. Not just you.

  5. Bstu Says:

    Yes, but surely we can all come to an agreement that fat is bad. Right?

    You don’t believe that?

    Well, then surely you can at least concede that fat is bad. Right?

    No?

    Okay, then we all can agree that fat is bad.

    That wasn’t a question that time. We just all agree it. Stop rudely disagreeing with what we all agree on. It just shows you don’t know what you’re talking about.

    Which is all to day, no. Not just you.

  6. meowser Says:

    Oh good, I’m glad it’s not just me. Thanks.

    (And I finally perma-spammed “tom brokaw.” Don’t know what the hell took me so long.)

    • KellyK Says:

      Perma-spammed…I’m picturing him buried under mountains of pink meat-like stuff now, ranting and raving, while we all go on our merry way, ignoring his existence.

  7. Bilt4cmfrt Says:

    Oh, it ain’t you. This is what I like to call the un-unified theory of weight loss. I find it ever so entertaining when they all jump up with the ‘It’s so simple’ and then spin off into 101 different theories on ‘how it worked for X so it’ll work for you too’ and their ALL right. Every. Single. One. Of. Them. Well, what that makes pretty clear to me is that NONE of them know, what the fuck, they are talking about. Full Stop.

    See: it is pretty simple.

  8. Patsy Nevins Says:

    Amen. And the news headlines, especially when I check my yahoo account, from these idiots who manage, the gods know HOW, to get idiotic books published with incredibly nannyish titles such as “Eat this, Not that” of articles yahoo seems to think we NEED to read telling us what foods to choose at any particular restaurant or fast food place we stop at, & go on to trot out ‘tips’ I have been hearing/reading for at least 50 years…use a smaller plate, take small portion, chew each bite at least 32 times, put down your fork between bites, take sips of water, yadda, yadda, because, as we ALL know, fat people eat differently & SO MUCH MORE than thin people.

    Then, of course, we also have the joy of people in REAL life, such as my son, who as an adult is built exactly like his two thin grandfathers, but who went through a chunky period between the ages of 9 or so & 12, who is both food & fatphobic, & who believes that if I did all the right things & wanted to badly enough & ‘corrected my unhealthy eating habits’, I too could suddenly become a thin person. Ah, yes, “growing into adolescence thinned me out, then I became obsessive about living on a diet & over-exercising (something I have done much of my life as well), so you should be able to get thin too.” I have had MORE than enough of people who assume that they know better than I do how I should live in my body & I am totally fed up with those who appear ready to slap a teenage girl in the stocks & horsewhip her for eating an ice cream cone. In the first place, all these ‘experts’ do not know what they are taking about; in the second place, it is no one else’s damn business how you or I or any anonymous teenager eat & live in our bodies.

  9. sannanina Says:

    Definitely not just you. Plus, if the article or blog post in question is in any way fat positive and/ or critical of the “war on obesity” there are always comments that ask why the author thinks it is wrong to encourage people to eat healthy food and exercise even if the author stated clearly that s/he has nothing against these things.

    Also, links to articles providing evidence that diets don’t work, that stigma hurts people’s health, and that fat people experience discrimination generally are either ignored or one sentence/ number from these articles is cited out of context.

    Not to mention that fat people saying that they do exercise and don’t eat vast amounts of food are usually called liars and that people who say they gained weight due to taking a certain medication or due to a health condition either experience the same kind of treatment, are labeled as exceptions, or simply get ignored.

    And finally, my favorite: The claim that you are contradicting the “whole medical community” whenever you say that the health risks of fatness are probably exagerrated and that in any case there is plenty of evidence that diets don’t work for most people and do more harm than good.

    Actually, that last one – together with the claim that I don’t understand science – pisses me off the most. And although I know it is childish I am always tempted to tell people that, hey, I have got a degree in biochemistry and cell biology – and I was almost a straight A student when studying these subject, not to mention that I have another degree in psychology and currently work as a research psychologist, and guess what, my statistics and research methods education was far better that what most people with a medical degree got. I UNDERSTAND SCIENCE. I AM A FREAKIN’ SCIENTIST.

    Actually, I think I should stay away from commenting on the internet for a while… I lately have a hard time not to come accross as very angry and even a little aggressive commenting on non-fatosphere blog entries/ articles and as sad and without hope when leaving comments in the fatosphere. But this is just so frustrating… (I can deal with disagreement. However, disagreement that denies my experience and does not even try to consider my point of view pretty much pushes all the buttons I have.)

  10. wriggles Says:

    People are choosing to buy into this crap, because they feel it meets their needs.

    They want to believe it so we aren’t really facing a rationale but a state of willful delusion.

  11. Meowser Says:

    And finally, my favorite: The claim that you are contradicting the “whole medical community” whenever you say that the health risks of fatness are probably exagerrated and that in any case there is plenty of evidence that diets don’t work for most people and do more harm than good.

    Yeah, don’t tell my doctors — ALL of them — that the “whole medical community” which has never even spoken to me, much less run labs and evaluated me and prescribed me meds with full knowledge of their side-effects profiles, knows my body better than they do. I don’t think I’ve had a doctor or NP yet, in all the multiple many places I’ve lived, who didn’t believe me when I said I had a metabolic disorder; it’s that painfully obvious, if you have even cursory knowledge of how these things present.

  12. sannanina Says:

    Yeah, don’t tell my doctors — ALL of them — that the “whole medical community” which has never even spoken to me, much less run labs and evaluated me and prescribed me meds with full knowledge of their side-effects profiles, knows my body better than they do. I don’t think I’ve had a doctor or NP yet, in all the multiple many places I’ve lived, who didn’t believe me when I said I had a metabolic disorder; it’s that painfully obvious, if you have even cursory knowledge of how these things present.

    True – I didn’t mention that the claim that everyone with a medical degree agrees that obesity can be cured by changes in diet and exercise habits in every single person is of course completely false. Yet I unfortunately one of the fat people who has had almost only bad experiences with doctors when it comes to my weight – although I have to say that while they were some jerks who put me in the “stupid, lazy, and disgusting box” as soon as I entered their office a lot of doctors have been decent to me while still thinking that I should go on yet another diet (despite knowing that I am recovering from an eating disorder that was probably triggered by dieting). But I also find the idea that all doctors have a perfect understanding of what is a well-designed, well-controlled study ridiculous.

  13. sannanina Says:

    (So basically I am a bit bitter and angry when it comes to doctors and also therapists – which is unfair, because I am pretty sure the level of fat-prejudice in the medical community probably isn’t higher than in the rest of society. However, I am really sick of going to a doctor while constantly worrying that he or she will hurt instead of help me.)

  14. StellaT Says:

    It consistently amazes me that people think their feelings about anything are important.

    “Hey a story about Fat People. Let me tell them what I think they should do. Because they DESERVE to know my wisdom!”

    I have reached the breaking point with general online comment sections. If you don’t like seeing my fat ass then shut up or go DIAF.

  15. erylin Says:

    i know i have found that if you tell the nurse at the beginning of the docotrs apointment, when they weight to flaty refuse to get on the scale….i tell them “im a recovering bulimic ands seeing my weight COULD throw me into a week long binge/purge cycle” you’d be surpised how that makes NO doctors talk about your weight.

  16. Kate217 Says:

    Oh, and please don’t kill Tinkerbell; I would miss her terribly.

  17. noceleryplease Says:

    I’m sure I WOULD notice, if I didn’t have a strict policy of NEVER reading the comments!

  18. nycivan Says:

    me too, as a generl rule do not read non fat o sphere comments on the subject of fat, it is too disheartening

  19. Ms. Fontana Says:

    It’s not just you. And as someone who also has spent a lot of time in the ED community, it’s not just the fatties that get advise from these “experts.” My favorites were the men who would be like “honestly, we don’t think you look good that skinny,” as some well meaning attempt to wake up the anorexic girls who were obviously doing all this to please men and would get better immediately if they just knew how Men Really Feel. Thanks Mr. Man, I’m all better now!
    I think for a lot of these ignoramus’s, weight control on either end of the scale seems so easy to them because they probably haven’t personally had to worry about it, because they have not been subjected to the same kinds of shame and scrutiny as most women have. And as for the female ignoramus’s, they maybe are in that evangelical stage of early onset AN or a successful diet that hasn’t yet backfired and don’t want any facts harshing their buzz. And as for the supposed medical “facts” that everyone is talking about, it’s really just crap they read in diet books, websites, ads, etc. that are a lot more widely read than any real medical reports.
    So, I know where these people are coming from, but reading their comments still gives me little panic attacks. All I can do is remember to consider the source, and their usual lack of critical thinking and spelling/grammar skillz makes it easy to do that.

  20. Bekbek Says:

    I left the tv on when I went to shower this morning, and Celebrity Fit Club was on. The snippet I heard as I walked through the room was “Very very few people are genetically programmed to be fat.” and then some talk about thyroids, since that is THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE EXCUSE. Apparently genotype has no effect on phenotype (if only you have enough willpower), and I wasted A LOT of money on all those crazy genetics classes.

  21. Piffle Says:

    I thought it very interesting that, depending upon your genetics, you may or may not build muscle from exercising. It’s an interesting tidbit that shows that something as basic as exercising varies in the population. Moving more may or may not have the same effect on you as it does on me.

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/59439.php

  22. Emerald Says:

    No, it’s not just you. I’m beginning to wonder if I should start avoiding non-Fatosphere comments too…hubby says they’re probably what’s raising my blood pressure. That and the fear that at some point my doctor will turn to me and say ‘You know, if you just lost some weight…’ because we all know that’s what the entire medical community believes…despite the fact that I haven’t been weighed by any doctor at my surgery in over a decade. OK, I’m paranoid.

    The especially annoying ones are the guys who say ‘It’s about health, fat is not healthy’…and then go and reveal where they’re really coming from by insisting that ‘real men’ are programmed by evolution to go for ‘hot skinny chicks’ and that any man who says he likes fat women is lying, and isn’t manly enough to get a proper woman…Yawn. I’m actually pretty grateful that being a fat woman lessens the odds of anyone so steamingly arrogant ever hitting on me.

  23. bumerry Says:

    I have a metabolic disease too – mitochondrial disease. It causes progressively severe exercise intolerance. Funny that the Bouchard et. al study Piffle sent (Thanks Piffle!) didn’t frame it that way. They essentially labeled it laziness. We all know what “they aren’t motivated to stop being sedentary” really means socially – it implies willful laziness.

    But doesn’t natural and healthy variation of exercise tolerance and muscle building capacity in humans make sense? We shouldn’t just label outlying traits at the extremes of the range as disease. We don’t label pale skin as a disease entity, even though albinism is a disease that causes pale skin (much as Type 2 Diabetes causes weight gain) and fair skinned people get skin cancer more often. We don’t label tall people as uninsurable even though they have more strokes, which are expensive to treat. We don’t say that short people are inevitably unhealthy or just too lazy to grow, even though many diseases cause short stature and medications can stunt growth (much as antidepressants cause weight gain).

    But think about it – might not people whose bodies are in the early stages of congenital but slow growing illnesses MAXIMIZE their lifespans by listening to their bodies’ signals to not exercise vigorously? Think about the heart, the blood vessels, the lungs…none have nerve endings that evoke direct pain signals, like skin does when it is scraped and you can know exactly where the problem is. They cause referred (misplaced) pain, like jaw and arm pain in heart attacks. I think that they might also cause exercise intolerance out of bodily self preservation, so to speak. Vigorous exercise kills athletes all the time.

    Indeed, if anyone wants to help me in a project to estimate how much money athletic injuries and related disease – osteoarthritis and brain damage, anyone? – cost the country, I’d be glad of the help. It would make a satisfying counterpoint to the “obesity related disease costs X dollars argument.”

  24. bumerry Says:

    I have a metabolic disease too – mitochondrial disease. It causes progressively severe exercise intolerance. Funny that the Bouchard et. al study Piffle sent (Thanks Piffle!) didn’t frame variations in muscle building that way. They essentially labeled it laziness. We all know what “they aren’t motivated to stop being sedentary” really means socially – it implies willful laziness.

    But doesn’t natural and healthy variation of exercise tolerance and muscle building capacity in humans make sense? We shouldn’t just label outlying traits at the extremes of the range as disease. We don’t label pale skin as a disease entity, even though albinism is a disease that causes pale skin (much as Type 2 Diabetes causes weight gain) and fair skinned people get skin cancer more often. We don’t label tall people as uninsurable even though they have more strokes, which are expensive to treat. We don’t say that short people are inevitably unhealthy or just too lazy to grow, even though many diseases cause short stature and medications can stunt growth (much as antidepressants cause weight gain).

    But think about it – might not people whose bodies are in the early stages of congenital but slow growing illnesses MAXIMIZE their lifespans by listening to their bodies’ signals to not exercise vigorously? Think about the heart, the blood vessels, the lungs…none have nerve endings that evoke direct pain signals, like skin does when it is scraped and you can know exactly where the problem is. They cause referred (misplaced) pain, like jaw and arm pain in heart attacks. I think that they might also cause exercise intolerance out of bodily self preservation, so to speak. Vigorous exercise kills athletes all the time.

    Indeed, if anyone wants to help me in a project to estimate how much money athletic injuries and related disease – osteoarthritis and brain damage, anyone? – cost the country, I’d be glad of the help. It would make a satisfying counterpoint to the “obesity related disease costs X dollars argument.”

  25. anon Says:

    Just a note about “tombrokaw” aka trolly mctrollerson. In comments elsewhere he’s shared his diet plan of eating 500 calories a day. So I think we can maybe all understand where he’s coming from, at least, and wish him a speedy recovery.

  26. Sniper Says:

    You sound like you’ve been reading Jezebel.

    My “favorites” are those ever so reasonable people who claim to have nothing against fat people, but they would like to open a dialogue about what exactly “we” (virtuous thin people) are going to do about “them” (stupid fat people who haven’t heard of diet or exercise). I think I actually hate those people more than the “put down the fork” crowd because they’re bigots who get all hurt and indignant when you call them on it.


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